Teaching

University of North Dakota

English 308: The Art of Writing Nonfiction (Spring 2020)
-This course explores both personal and political adversity in different subgenres of creative nonfiction including the personal or narrative essay, memoir, and journalism through the graphic novel. From analyzing these pieces for their content as well as their rhetorical effectiveness, students craft their own braided essays. Authors included in this course are Sei Shōnagon, Montaigne, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, and Joe Sacco.

English 130: Writing for a Public Audience (2018-2020)
Theme: Consumerism — Students begin to engage with the wide-spread impact of consumerism and its associated implications from how people are encouraged to spend beyond their means to how we identify individuals based on their purchasing choices. Students then apply their research to creating a mock-project that could benefit the local community.
– Continues the work of College Composition I with an emphasis on rhetoric and critical thinking. Requires the writing and production of both primary and secondary research, while asking students to apply that research to larger community issues. Students will practice writing with an immediate and explicit public purpose.

English 228: Adaptation (2019)
– This class aims to engage students in critical and transnational discourse. More specifically, students will consider the complexities of adaptation studies by exposure not only to a number of adaptations in various mediums (short story, graphic novel, film, etc.) but with multiple scholarly approaches to discussing adaptation (e.g. Benjamin, Bazin, Leitch, Hutcheon, Murray, Elliott). We will attempt to move away from “fidelity” by looking at what it means to refer to an “original/source” text and the socio-historical forces playing on the source and the adaptation with consideration to the translation between mediums.


English 130: Writing for a Public Audience (2016-2018)
Theme: Technology — Students explore what technology means and its capabilities, both positive and negative, within a community. They then apply their research to creating a mock-project that could benefit the local community.
– Continues the work of College Composition I with an emphasis on rhetoric and critical thinking. Requires the writing and production of both primary and secondary research, while asking students to apply that research to larger community issues. Students will practice writing with an immediate and explicit public purpose.

English 110: College Composition (2015)
– Immersion in college-level critical reading and expository writing, emphasizing revision and careful preparation of manuscripts.

Northern Michigan University
Theatre 361: Modern Drama
– Modern playwrights and their plays, the physical stage, dramatic criticism and aesthetics from 1850 to the present.

Theatre 352: Directing Theory
– Introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of stage direction.

Theatre 132: Acting 1
– Introduction to theoretical and applied aspects of acting. Applied onstage exercises include solo and ensemble acting assignments.

Theatre 100: Introduction to Theatre
– Study of theatre as an art form, including history, aesthetics, production and dramatic literature.